KYD Network serves as the intermediary organization for Kalamazoo County’s Out-of-School Time (OST) sector.

2020-2021

Impact

Thriving through precision and resilience.

Our Model

Thriving Youth

When youth participate in high-quality OST programming their odds change by improving their social-emotional learning skills, school attendance, and academic performance.

Program Areas

Organizations participate in our continuous quality improvement process and participate in targeted professional development that allows them to improve their program quality, strengthen youth social-emotional learning skills, provide opportunities for youth leadership and authentic family engagement, and create more inclusive and equitable learning environments.

Partners

Cohort members and our community partners share resources to maximize efficiency and impact.

How We Support the Sector

50 Memorandums of Understanding
Signed

350+ Youth Development Professionals

49
Workshops
Offered

18
Out-of-School Time Partners

Program Areas

Program Quality

Youth Program Quality Assessment (YPQA) results indicated the ratings are the same in both school years on Safe Environment (4.7), Interaction (3.3) and Engagement (2.5) and there is slight growth on Supportive Environment (4.2 to 4.4). Overall, Safe Environment, Supportive Environment, and
Interaction are above the national averages, and Engagement is slightly below the national average
(2.5 vs 2.6)

“This program has been very positive in my son’s life and we truly appreciate everything.”

Major Progress
0%

Youth formed committees within the clubs where they created/initiated clubs they were interested in and voted (what, when, where, how). Every youth that had an interest gained participation.

Moderate Progress
0%

They could lead in their individual meetings, but not as a whole group. 

Minor Progress
0%
The opportunities given to the leaders were reading from a book during book club.

Almost all survey participants indicated that at least to some extent . . .

Youth were more engaged (96%)

Instruction quality improved (98%)

Youth developed skills (98%)

Social Emotional Learning

SEL Affinity Group meetings were held monthly from October 2020 to March 2021 in the context of COVID and racism pandemics.  The objectives were to explore IBA in the context of race, transition from Deficit Youth Development to Positive Youth Development and to Critical Youth Development, and the necessity of mental health and self care.  

Almost half (48%) of youth survey participants would like to have time to talk about their feelings.

Major Progress
0%

Daily affirmations, SEL journal prompts, self care tips, academic and career tips.  

Moderate Progress
0%

Three foundational Social Emotional Learning (SEL) skills:

Identity

Strong sense of “who I am” and recognizing where I hold power and privilege; grounded in my core values; honor my culture(s); and have empathy for others and myself.

Belonging

When I belong, my racial, cultural and intersecting identities are welcomed, valued, represented and celebrated. When I belong, I feel motivated to be and to do my personal best.

Agency

Youth practice the skills they need to move through their intersecting communities in an authentic way so that they can dismantle oppressive systems and build a more equitable future.

Family Engagement

The BOSTnet (Build the Out-of-School Time Network) Family Engagement assessment was administered in the fall/winter.  Based on the result, items were identified for celebration (e.g., friendly greeting and on-target communication) or growth (e.g., holding periodic orientations and providing a resource corner).   Although there was no post-test in the spring, based on the end-of-year reflections, the vast majority (88%) indicated either Major or Moderate progress was made.

Major Progress
0%

Pre pandemic we were working on [family engagement] as a focus. Pandemic circumstances, we used parent communication app Bloomz. Took pictures, updates, messages to families. Families couldn’t come into the spaces, but could see how things were going virtually. Moving forward, having family nights with the pool and healthy snacks.

Moderate Progress
0%

Program has a clear and concise “Parent/Caregiver Handbook” that explains all program policies and procedures that families need to know. Family-friendly language is used, not jargon or acronyms, in all written communications to Families.

All family participants who responded, indicated that they would recommend the program to another young person or family. Additionally, caregivers “Completely Agree” that their child was . . .

Inclusion & Equity

Using the Annie E. Casey Race Matters Assessment; organizations established goals. The sector identified three sector goals for the next several years:

Goal 1: Wage equity within the OST sector

Ten organizations reflected on their progress, the majority of them indicated that they made major progress.

Major Progress
0%

Wages were significantly increased due to Hub One funding.

Moderate Progress
0%
Minor Progress
0%

At end of the school year, raised pay rate $10.50 to $12.00/hour.

Goal 2: Use disaggregated Data by race to make decisions

Eleven organizations reflected on their progress, about half of them indicated that they made moderate progress.

Major Progress
0%

Upgraded this for all registration forms, and all surveys. We get to see who is coming to our events, when and why. If we are not getting the correct targeting, we created intentional BIPOC advertisement/marketing.

Moderate Progress
0%
Minor Progress
0%

We are interacting with the data in informal ways right now. We are looking over the data but are still processing how to use this data to make long term plans. This is also part of how we use our data and we are intentionally wanting to use our data fully.

Goal 3: Creating policies & procedures for BIPOC staff when they face a barrier or inequity

Thirteen organizations reflected on their progress, almost half of the organizations indicated no progress was made.

Major Progress
0%

Within bylaws, we have BIPOC policies; asking for new staff to have experience; within values and mission statement.

Moderate Progress
0%
Minor Progress
0%

 In the past six months, created a DEI committee. They are giving training in different areas for BIPOC/LBGTQ+ staff/community.

Youth Leadership

We made significant progress engaging more youth.

Virtual convenings such as the Fall 2020, Youth-led candidate forum, Youth Mobility Program and Youth Mobility Ambassadors and the Voices of Youth journalism project with Second Wave Media aided this growth.

Major Progress
0%

The youth are deciding what they will focus on. They are also participating in the Spanish DESSA pilot.

Moderate Progress
0%

They could lead in their individual meetings, but not as a whole group.